These Haunted Charleston Spots May Leave You Screaming

For a city so steeped in history, it is no surprise Charleston, South Carolina is known as one of the most haunted cities in America.

The Southern Weekend’s Philip Weiss sat down with Janice Plisco, a ghost walk guide for Bulldog Tours in downtown Charleston, to pick her brain about the Holy City’s most haunted locations. Plisco has been exposing thrill-seekers to some of Charleston’s creepiest, spine-tingling sites since joining Bulldog in 2008, and even claims to have witnessed some ghastly encounters of her own.

Below are five spooky spots in Charleston that even Plisco says she wouldn’t be caught alone in at night:

 

Old City Jail – 21 Magazine Street

Built in 1802, Denmark Vesey is believed to have spent his final days locked in one of jail's towers before his execution in 1822.

Built in 1802, Denmark Vesey is believed to have spent his final days locked in one of jail’s towers before his execution in 1822. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Home of Charleston’s most notorious criminals during the 1800s and early 1900s, the Old Jail is now said to be haunted by prisoners who were executed on site. “The absolute creepiest place here in Charleston is the Old City Jail. Out of over 30 guides that work here, there are only about six that will do that tour,” said Plisco. “Every time I am in there, I feel that sense of someone watching me.” Plisco says that while she has not witnessed a ghost sighting, she can’t enter the jail without feeling something is in her personal space. “It is a beautiful building, but it is not the kind of place where you want to hang out for an extended length of time.”

 

Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon – East Bay Street at Broad Street

Now a National Historic Landmark, the Exchange and Provost served as a British prison during the Revolutionary War.

Now a National Historic Landmark, the Exchange and Provost served as a British prison during the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Built in 1767, the Old Exchange once served as a customs house, commerce center, and post office. Underground, the dungeon kept pirates, slaves, and war criminals shackled in abominable conditions. Many prisoners are said to have suffered terrible deaths while locked in their chains, making this building a prime spot for eerie activity. Plisco says patrons have captured orbs – spheres of light that are often associated with ghosts – in photographs taken while in the dungeon. “I love that building, everything about it. It is my favorite in the city,” she said. “But I would not walk into that dungeon alone.”

 

Poogan’s Porch – 72 Queen Street

Legend goes the building's former homeowner continues to haunt the Queen Street building long after her death. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Legend goes the building’s former homeowner continues to haunt the Queen Street building long after her death. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Poogan’s Porch has been serving up delicious entrees with a side of ghostly activity since opening its doors in 1976. The legend goes, Poogan’s is haunted by Zoe St. Amand, a school teacher who called the building home until her death in 1954. Plisco says in addition to being seen creeping along the restaurant’s porch, Zoe is also known to creep up behind guests in the ladies bathroom, revealing herself in the mirror. “I eat dinner there all the time, I just won’t use the bathroom,” Plisco says of the restaurant.

 

Circular Graveyard – 150 Meeting Street

The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is said to be haunted by ghosts of the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is said to be haunted by ghosts of the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Plisco lists the Circular Graveyard among her creepiest Charleston locations not just because of what she has heard, but what she has seen. The veteran ghost guide says she was in her first year with Bulldog when she spotted a pale, ghostly figure walking through her tour group at the graveyard before disappearing in the shadows. “I could see it taking long strides, swinging its hands fast, a figure of a man. It made me lose my train of thought,” she recalls. Plisco says she went on to see the same figure, which she describes as possibly a Revolutionary War soldier, on four other occasions. She says other tour-goers have experienced similar encounters while in the graveyard, adding to its creep factor. Located next to the Circular Congregation Church, the graveyard was built in 1681, giving it plenty of time to house future ghosts and ghouls.

 

Unitarian Graveyard – 8 Archdale Street

Construction began on the Unitarian Church in 1772, making it the oldest Unitarian church in the South. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Construction began on the Unitarian Church in 1772, making it the oldest Unitarian church in the South. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

The graveyard at the Unitarian Church is just one of those places that looks terrifying even in the daylight. Plisco says she was in the graveyard being trained by another guide when the guide and four other women in the tour literally ran away, claiming to have seen something levitating. “I would say, even walking in there alone in the day, you never feel quite alone,” Plisco says. Many claim the Unitarian Graveyard is haunted by the ghost of Annabel Lee, a Charleston woman who is said to be the subject of Edgar Allen Poe’s poem, “Annabel Lee.”

 

Of course, these aren’t the only haunted locations in Charleston. Leave us a comment to let us know about your favorite spot to go ghost hunting. To see more spooky Charleston destinations, click here.

 

This story initially appeared on Live5News.com. All rights reserved.

For a city so steeped in history, it is no surprise Charleston, South Carolina is known as one of the most haunted cities in America.

The Southern Weekend’s Philip Weiss sat down with Janice Plisco, a ghost walk guide for Bulldog Tours in downtown Charleston, to pick her brain about the Holy City’s most haunted locations. Plisco has been exposing thrill-seekers to some of Charleston’s creepiest, spine-tingling sites since joining Bulldog in 2008, and even claims to have witnessed some ghastly encounters of her own.

Below are five spooky spots in Charleston that even Plisco says she wouldn’t be caught alone in at night:

 

Old City Jail – 21 Magazine Street

Built in 1802, Denmark Vesey is believed to have spent his final days locked in one of jail's towers before his execution in 1822.

Built in 1802, Denmark Vesey is believed to have spent his final days locked in one of jail’s towers before his execution in 1822. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Home of Charleston’s most notorious criminals during the 1800s and early 1900s, the Old Jail is now said to be haunted by prisoners who were executed on site. “The absolute creepiest place here in Charleston is the Old City Jail. Out of over 30 guides that work here, there are only about six that will do that tour,” said Plisco. “Every time I am in there, I feel that sense of someone watching me.” Plisco says that while she has not witnessed a ghost sighting, she can’t enter the jail without feeling something is in her personal space. “It is a beautiful building, but it is not the kind of place where you want to hang out for an extended length of time.”

 

Old Exchange & Provost Dungeon – East Bay Street at Broad Street

Now a National Historic Landmark, the Exchange and Provost served as a British prison during the Revolutionary War.

Now a National Historic Landmark, the Exchange and Provost served as a British prison during the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Built in 1767, the Old Exchange once served as a customs house, commerce center, and post office. Underground, the dungeon kept pirates, slaves, and war criminals shackled in abominable conditions. Many prisoners are said to have suffered terrible deaths while locked in their chains, making this building a prime spot for eerie activity. Plisco says patrons have captured orbs – spheres of light that are often associated with ghosts – in photographs taken while in the dungeon. “I love that building, everything about it. It is my favorite in the city,” she said. “But I would not walk into that dungeon alone.”

 

Poogan’s Porch – 72 Queen Street

Legend goes the building's former homeowner continues to haunt the Queen Street building long after her death. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Legend goes the building’s former homeowner continues to haunt the Queen Street building long after her death. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Poogan’s Porch has been serving up delicious entrees with a side of ghostly activity since opening its doors in 1976. The legend goes, Poogan’s is haunted by Zoe St. Amand, a school teacher who called the building home until her death in 1954. Plisco says in addition to being seen creeping along the restaurant’s porch, Zoe is also known to creep up behind guests in the ladies bathroom, revealing herself in the mirror. “I eat dinner there all the time, I just won’t use the bathroom,” Plisco says of the restaurant.

 

Circular Graveyard – 150 Meeting Street

The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is said to be haunted by ghosts of the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

The graveyard at the Circular Congregational Church is said to be haunted by ghosts of the Revolutionary War. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Plisco lists the Circular Graveyard among her creepiest Charleston locations not just because of what she has heard, but what she has seen. The veteran ghost guide says she was in her first year with Bulldog when she spotted a pale, ghostly figure walking through her tour group at the graveyard before disappearing in the shadows. “I could see it taking long strides, swinging its hands fast, a figure of a man. It made me lose my train of thought,” she recalls. Plisco says she went on to see the same figure, which she describes as possibly a Revolutionary War soldier, on four other occasions. She says other tour-goers have experienced similar encounters while in the graveyard, adding to its creep factor. Located next to the Circular Congregation Church, the graveyard was built in 1681, giving it plenty of time to house future ghosts and ghouls.

 

Unitarian Graveyard – 8 Archdale Street

Construction began on the Unitarian Church in 1772, making it the oldest Unitarian church in the South. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

Construction began on the Unitarian Church in 1772, making it the oldest Unitarian church in the South. (Photo credit: Bulldog Tours)

The graveyard at the Unitarian Church is just one of those places that looks terrifying even in the daylight. Plisco says she was in the graveyard being trained by another guide when the guide and four other women in the tour literally ran away, claiming to have seen something levitating. “I would say, even walking in there alone in the day, you never feel quite alone,” Plisco says. Many claim the Unitarian Graveyard is haunted by the ghost of Annabel Lee, a Charleston woman who is said to be the subject of Edgar Allen Poe’s poem, “Annabel Lee.”

 

Of course, these aren’t the only haunted locations in Charleston. Leave us a comment to let us know about your favorite spot to go ghost hunting. To see more spooky Charleston destinations, click here.

 

This story initially appeared on Live5News.com. All rights reserved.

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