The Amazing Story behind Sweetgrass Baskets

The Charleston City Market is home to dozens of artisans selling everything from local artwork and foods to handmade clothing and jewelry. But of all there is to see at the Market, sweetgrass baskets may be the most unique.

Sweetgrass basket-weaving has been a Lowcountry tradition since the 17th century. The skill was brought to South Carolina by West African slaves from Sierra Leone, and has been passed down generation to generation. Each basket is handmade using natural materials like bulrush, pinestraw, and sweetgrass. Gullah artists use a coiled weave to create intricate baskets of all shapes and sizes. A single basket can take upwards of several hours to complete.

Host Molly Mckinney and WCSC Live 5 News Meteorologist Bill Walsh head to the Charleston City Market to learn more about sweetgrass basket-weaving from the artists themselves.

Copyright 2017 The Southern Weekend. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Charleston City Market is home to dozens of artisans selling everything from local artwork and foods to handmade clothing and jewelry. But of all there is to see at the Market, sweetgrass baskets may be the most unique.

Sweetgrass basket-weaving has been a Lowcountry tradition since the 17th century. The skill was brought to South Carolina by West African slaves from Sierra Leone, and has been passed down generation to generation. Each basket is handmade using natural materials like bulrush, pinestraw, and sweetgrass. Gullah artists use a coiled weave to create intricate baskets of all shapes and sizes. A single basket can take upwards of several hours to complete.

Host Molly Mckinney and WCSC Live 5 News Meteorologist Bill Walsh head to the Charleston City Market to learn more about sweetgrass basket-weaving from the artists themselves.

Copyright 2017 The Southern Weekend. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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